vaccination image

vaccination image

COVID-19 vaccination data

Published 02/12/2021   |   Reading Time minutes

The Welsh Government published its updated COVID-19 vaccination strategy for autumn and winter 2021 in October. The approach for the strategy is evolving, continuing to focus on providing boosters for the most vulnerable, vaccinating children and young people and the principle of leaving nobody behind. But there is also an increased emphasis on rolling out the booster more widely, and continuing to offer the vaccination to all those who are eligible but haven’t yet had any of the vaccines.

How many people have received a dose of a vaccine?

As of 1 December 2021, Wales has administered 2,469,805 first doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, which accounts for 77.9% of its total population and 2,266,994 second doses, which is 71.5% of its total population. A further 917,022 people have received booster or 3rd dose vaccinations representing 28.9% of the total population.

Percentage of the total population who have received a first, second and third dose of a vaccine

Map of the UK showing: Wales 1st dose 2387746, 75.3%. Wales 2nd dose 2227522, 70.3%. England 1st dose 41131105, 72.7%. England 2nd dose 37780849, 66.8%. Scotland 1st dose 4235075, 72.7%. Scotland 2nd dose 3854847, 70.5%. Northern Ireland 1st dose 1314779, 69.4%. Northern Ireland 2nd dose 1215311, 64.1%.

Source: UK Government

Note: The population of each UK nation is based on most recent Office for National Statistics data.

You might see different population percentages being used in relation to the vaccination rollout. Some sources compare vaccine doses to the total population and others compare doses to the population aged 12+. We are presenting both to show the difference. 

The map above shows how Wales compares to the other UK nations on the percentage of the total population who have received their first, second and third doses.

The graph below shows the percentage of the population aged 12 and over who have received their first, second and third doses of a vaccine over time.

Percentage of population aged 12+ who have received a vaccination by first, second and booster or third dose

Of the population aged 16 and over, 92% received a first dose and 85% received a second dose since December 2020.

How is the rollout in Wales progressing?

The first milestone

The first vaccination strategy milestone was to have offered a first dose of a vaccine to everyone in priority groups 1 to 4 by mid-February 2021. On 12 February the First Minister for Wales, Mark Drakeford, announced that the first milestone had been met.

The second milestone

The second vaccination milestone was to offer the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine to priority groups 5 to 9 by the middle of April 2021. The Welsh Government said the second milestone was achieved on 4 April.

The third milestone

The third vaccination milestone represented the second phase of the vaccination programme. The Welsh Government’s aim is to offer a first dose of a vaccine to those aged 18-49 by the end of July 2021 and to reach 75% uptake of first doses in all priority groups.

Our graph below shows the breakdown by priority group and that the 18-29 age group has now reached 78.7% uptake.

The overall progress towards the three milestones are shown in our charts below for first dose uptake, primary course uptake and booster dose uptake. A primary course is two doses with the exception of severely immunosuppressed who are recommended three doses.

Percentage of people who have received a first vaccine dose by priority group

Milestone 1: Care home residents 98.1%. Care home workers 94.2%. Health care workers 97%. Social care workers 45114 vaccinated, group size not available. 80 years and older 96.2%. Aged 75-79 97%. Aged 70-74 96.3%. Clinically extremely vulnerable aged 16-69 95%. Milestone 2: Aged 65-69 95.1%. Clinical risk groups aged 16-64 90.6%. Aged 60-64 93.5%. Aged 55-59 91.8%. Aged 50-54 90%. Milestone 3: Aged 40-49 85.1%. Aged 30-39 78.3%. Aged 18-29 77.6%. Aged 16-17 71.9%.

 

Source: Public Health Wales

Percentage of people who have received a primary course of vaccine by priority group

 

Milestone 1: Care home residents 96.2%. Care home workers 91.3%. Health care workers 95.3%. Social care workers 44522 vaccinated, group size not available. 80 years and older 95.2%. Aged 75-79 96.2%. Aged 70-74 95.7%. Clinically extremely vulnerable aged 16-69 93.3%. Milestone 2: Aged 65-69 94.2%. Clinical risk groups aged 16-64 87.4%. Aged 60-64 92.3%. Aged 55-59 90.3%. Aged 50-54 88.1%. Milestone 3: Aged 40-49 82%. Aged 30-39 72.9%. Aged 18-29 69.6%. Aged 16-17 16.6%.

Source: Public Health Wales

Note: Primary course is two doses with the exception of severely immunosuppressed who are recommended three doses

Percentage of people who have received a booster vaccine by priority group

 

See Public Health Wales data for full details.

Source: Public Health Wales

How is the rollout progressing in each health board?

PHW publishes a weekly update to show the proportion of those in each priority group who have received a first and second dose by local health board and local authority.

The four graphs below show progress by local health board by the three milestones. They show those who have received both doses of a vaccine.

Percentage of care home residents, people aged 70-74, aged 75-79, aged 80 and over, and those who are critically extremely vulnerable (previously shielding) who have received both doses of a vaccine by Local Health Board of residence

See Public Health Wales data for full details.

Source: Public Health Wales

Percentage of those aged 65-69, aged 60-64, aged 55-59, aged 50-54 and those in clinical risk groups aged 16-64 who have received both doses of a vaccine by Local Health Board of residence

See Public Health Wales data for full details.

Source: Public Health Wales

Percentage of those aged 18-29, aged 30-39 and aged 40-49 who have received both doses of a vaccine by Local Health Board of residence.

Source: Public Health Wales

Percentage of those aged 12-15 who have received a first dose of a vaccine and percentage of those aged 16-17 who have received first and second doses of a vaccine, by Local Health Board.

Source: Public Health Wales

The interactive map below shows the percentage of adults aged 18 and over who have received both doses of a vaccine. The lighter colours represent the higher percentage of uptake. Hovering over the local authority will show uptake by second and booster doses for those aged 50+, those aged 80+, those in care homes and those aged 16-69 who are clinically extremely vulnerable in that area.

Percentage of adults aged 18 and over who have received both doses of a vaccine by local authority.

 

Source: Public Health Wales

*Residents of care homes for older adults. **CEV = clinically extremely vulnerable.

What’s next?

COVID-19 new variant (Omicron)

On 26 November 2021, the World Health Organisation (WHO) designated the variant B.1.1.529, named Omicron, a variant of concern, on the advice of WHO’s Technical Advisory Group on Virus Evolution (TAG-VE).  The WHO stated that Omicron has several mutations that may have an impact on how it behaves, for example, on how easily it spreads or the severity of illness it causes, but also indicate that information on the impact of Omicron is still limited.

The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) is monitoring and reporting on the number and spread of Omicron cases in the UK.

Preliminary evidence suggests people who have previously had COVID-19 could become reinfected more easily with Omicron, compared to previous variants. But at this early stage, it is not clear how transmissible it is, whether it causes more severe illness, or how effective current vaccines and treatments are against this new variant. The WHO indicate that existing PCR tests are able to detect Omicron and work is underway to determine the effectiveness of other tests, but initial UKHSA reports say they have found no evidence that lateral flow tests will not detect the variant.

Changes to the vaccination programme

In light of the potential threat posed by Omicron, the Joint Committee for Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) was asked to rapidly review the UK COVID-19 vaccination programme, looking at what changes, if any, were needed.

On 29 November the JCVI recommended a number of changes to the programme, “to accelerate the deployment of COVID-19 vaccines before the peak of any impending Omicron wave”:

  • Booster eligibility should be expanded to include all adults aged 18 years to 39 years;
  • The booster vaccination should be offered in order of descending age groups, with priority given to the vaccination of older adults and those in a COVID-19 at-risk group. The booster should be offered at a reduced minimum of three months after the primary course;
  • Individuals who are severely immunosuppressed should be offered a booster dose, with at least three months since a completed primary course;
  • Both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines should be used in the booster programme;
  • A second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for those aged 12 to 15 years is advised no sooner than 12 weeks after the first dose.

Also on 29 November, the Welsh Governments’ Minister for Health and Social Services issued a written statement, setting out that:

“I have accepted the recommendations of the JCVI, in line with the other nations of the UK. NHS Wales will do all that is necessary to increase capacity to implement this advice”.

Welsh Government subsequently published updated guidance on how people aged 18 and over will now be offered the booster vaccination, which notes:

“Please wait to be invited, your health board will contact you when it’s your turn. Booster vaccinations are being be offered in order of descending age groups, with priority given to the vaccination of older adults and those in a COVID-19 at-risk group”.

The guidance also notes that eligible frontline health and social care workers are also being prioritised first for a booster vaccine.  In Plenary on 30 November the Minister for Health and Social Services stated that there was a “plentiful supply” available of the vaccines needed, but acknowledged the scale of the challenge in delivering the accelerated programme:

“If we are going to go further, obviously, we are going to mount now a massive response in terms of how we mobilise this new vaccination army that we will be developing in the next few days. We've already, obviously, spoken to our health boards who are coming up with more detailed plans for us tomorrow. Discussions have already been had with local government, with the army, with all kinds of organisations to see what more can we put in place and who's up for this—who is up for helping us out at this very challenging time”.

The JCVI recommendations have been accepted by the devolved administrations in Scotland and Northern Ireland, and the UK Government has committed to offering a booster vaccine to all eligible adults in England aged 18 and over by the end of January.

COVID passes

Welsh Government have confirmed that from 27 November, COVID-19 vaccination boosters have been added to the digital NHS COVID Pass so people in Wales are able to demonstrate proof of a booster if they are travelling overseas.

Booster vaccinations will also show up automatically on the digital NHS COVID Pass but won’t for now be automatically available on the COVID Pass paper certificate. Boosters won’t be added to the domestic COVID Pass, as the requirement for a person to be “fully vaccinated” refers to having the first and second dose of the vaccine only.

In Plenary on 30 November the Minister for Health and Social Services acknowledged there were difficulties with delays on the COVID pass phone line, but stated that they had launched a recruitment drive to try and increase the number of people available to answer the phone.

Full updated information about the vaccination programme in Wales is provided in the Welsh Government’s weekly update.


Article by Paul Worthington, Joe Wilkes, Helen Jones and Božo Lugonja, Senedd Research, Welsh Parliament